Law School

Some of you may have seen scattered references to law school in my previous posts and therefore wondered about it. The gist of the story is that I am, in fact, in law school. How I got there is quite a story.

Back to Monday, 10 March 2009. I was busily doing my work in Rev. S.’s office when the phone rings. It was Uncle M., one of my mom’s younger brothers and one of the country’s big-bigshot lawyers, a renowned authority in civil and contract law. He runs the family’s law firm, started by my grandfather back in the 1930s. He droned on his usual imperative low bass voice:

Uncle M: Son, I have been thinking about you. I think you have a great mind for legal matters. You are uniquely qualified for being a lawyer. So, why don’t you give a try?

Myself: Yes, Uncle, I also have been thinking about it. But I have no money, and no way to get books. I am planning to start studying maybe next year, because with some luck I’ll be able to save some money…

Uncle M: Son, the moment is now. Don’t worry about the money. If you are willing, your studies will be paid on your behalf, no strings attached. As for books, you can always borrow textbooks from the law firm’s library. Now, son, this is an extremely important question: are you willing to enter into the study? Because your moment is NOW. Are you willing?

Myself: (Rather trembling) Yes, Uncle, I am willing.

Uncle M: Good. I’ve heard that Universidad Columbia has a great law school and they can get you started now. So go and register yourself TODAY!

Myself: Yes, Uncle, I will register today…

Uncle M: Attaboy. Send my love to your mom, will you? Good bye, son.

I hung up the phone, stunned. I told the conversation to Rev. S., who told me: “This is a long-awaited answer to some of my prayers. You really need to have a good paying secular job besides your theological training. The Church has not been completely fair to your commitment and you need to secure provision for your family. You have a job with me, but you know that our financing can dry up anytime. You will do great in the legal profession, and studying law will be great stewardship for you.”

Moreover, Rev. S. helped me by reorganizing my work schedule so I could opt for afternoon classes instead of evening ones; he also was kind enough to allow me to take days off in exam times, and many other courtesies.

Well, I told about the news to my mother and my wife, and both were enthusiastic. Dad was also very happy and supportive. So I went to the university that very day, registered, and then had my very first class session. That 10th of March was a momentous day; I started the day thinking it would be just a regular Monday, and I ended up being a law student…

Fast forward to today: I’m about to finish my semester. It has been really hectic, and tiring. But so far I am maintaining a 5.0 (equivalent to an American 4.0) GPA. Please pray for my studies; on Wednesday I must sit for final exams on Constitutional Law.

All in all, this has been a wonderful demonstration on how the Lord could turn your life upside down in a matter of minutes. He is really in control of our lives.

4 responses

  1. Eduardo

    I apologise for intruding here, but I would appreciate your advice. My wife and I (middle aged) are from South Africa. We are currently in Bolivia, and we plan to spend about two and a half months in Paraguay from mid July. We have a small Internet business to sustain us.

    Thing is, I have read all the travel blogs I could find, but none of them really tells me anything about life in Paraguay, e.g. which part of Asuncion a local would recommend for longer term living.

    If you have the time, I would really appreciate it if you would contact me by email, just for some advice. I will try to waste as little of your time as possible…

    Thanks in advance.
    Johan. Email [edited]

  2. That’s great to hear, Eduardo. It’s something not easily understood here in the US, but your story is so consistent with what we know about God’s providence working through the extended family. In the Bible, this is the norm.

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